Category: PeopleCode

Pinging and Posting from PeopleCode

I had a need to Ping a server to see if the server could get to it.  I also tried to post to it.  This code could be helpful for others, so I want to share it.  A post should normally go through the Integration Broker, but I first developed it at a time when I had a product that was supposed to go on servers with diverse versions of Integration Broker.

The Ping code doesn’t seem very reliable for some reason.  Something on the Java side doesn’t always work.  Still it might be helpful.

   Local JavaObject &url;
   Local JavaObject &conn;
   Local JavaObject &r;
   Local any &line;
   Local string &output;
   Local JavaObject &inet;
   Local string &address;

   MessageBox(0, "", 0, 0, "hostname: " | GetJavaClass("java.net.InetAddress").getLocalHost().getHostName());

   &address = "localhost";
   &inet = GetJavaClass("java.net.InetAddress").getByName(&address);
   MessageBox(0, "", 0, 0, &address | "(" | &inet.getHostAddress() | ") reachable: " | &inet.isReachable(5000));
   &address = "www.google.com";
   &inet = GetJavaClass("java.net.InetAddress").getByName(&address);
   MessageBox(0, "", 0, 0, &address | "(" | &inet.getHostAddress() | ") reachable: " | &inet.isReachable(5000));

   &url = CreateJavaObject("java.net.URL", "http://www.google.com");
   &conn = &url.openConnection();
   &conn.setRequestProperty("content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
   &conn.setRequestProperty("accept", "text/xml/html");
   &conn.setRequestProperty("accept-charset", "utf-8, iso_8859-1");
   &conn.setRequestProperty("userid", "????");
   &conn.setRequestProperty("pwd", "?????");
   &conn.setDoOutput( True);

   &output = "";
   &r = CreateJavaObject("java.io.BufferedReader", CreateJavaObject("java.io.InputStreamReader", &conn.getInputStream()));
   &line = &r.readLine();
   While &line <> Null
      &output = &output | Char(10) | Char(13) | &output;
      &line = &r.readLine();
   End-While;
   &r.close();

   MessageBox(0, "", 0, 0, &output);

Please make sure to adjust the URLs and hostnames to what you need.

Resources

New PeopleCode Dump Method

One of my old tricks was to create a PeopleCode dump from the system.  Then I could use a text editor tool such as gVim or Ultraedit to search through the code to find examples or certain uses of definitions.

Basically, a PeopleCode dump is easily created by searching for (Edit > Find In) a semicolon.  Because every statement must have a semicolon, it matches every statement of code in the system.  On the Find In dialog, checking the Save to File option will write out each line to a text file.

The problem is that Application Designer seems to load every line into memory.  If you don’t have a client machine with a ton of memory, you end up looking like this:

App Designer Out of Memory Error

 

Instead, I found this new tool called Decode PeopleCode.  You can download the latest zipped version of the program from here.

Once extracted, I had to configured the URL property in the DecodePC.properties file.  I set it to something like this:

url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@<server name>:1521/<db name>

I also had a problem with the JDBC driver for some reason.  It didn’t find the odbc5.jar file that was delivered.  I already had a copy of the odbc6.jar, so I just adjusted the classpath to include that.  If you run into the same problem, adjust the DecodePCODE.sh or DecodePCODE.bat file to contain the full path to the jar file.

Also, adjust the “outdir” property in the DecodePC.properties file to point to the directory where you want the output dumped.  Note that it will create a bunch of folders and files in that directory, so you may want to point it to an empty directory.

Then, I ran the program with this command to capture everything:

sh DecodePCODE.sh since 1901/01/01

Now, that creates each PeopleCode program in its own file.  The problem is that I want it all in a single file that I can run regular expressions against.  I could use grep, but I am used to a single file.  I cobbled this script together to build that single file:

#!/bin/bash


processFile() {
   outdirlen=$((${#OUTDIR} + 1))
   filename=$1
   lastUpdateFile=$( echo "$filename" | sed 's/\.pcode$/.last_update/' )
   peoplecodePath=${filename:$outdirlen}
   peoplecodePath=$( echo "$peoplecodePath" | sed 's/\//: /' | sed 's/\.pcode$//' | sed 's/\//./g')
   echo -e "\e[0K\r Writing: $peoplecodePath"
   echo "[$peoplecodePath]" >> "$OUTFILE"
   echo '/*   Details:' >> "$OUTFILE"
   echo '   Last Update User: ' $(head -n 1 "$lastUpdateFile") >> "$OUTFILE"
   echo '   Last Update Date/Time: ' $(tail -n 1 "$lastUpdateFile") >> "$OUTFILE"
   echo '*/' >> "$OUTFILE"
   cat "$filename" >> "$OUTFILE"
}


#  ------------------------------
#    Main
#  ------------------------------

OUTDIR=$( grep "outdir=" DecodePC.properties | sed 's/^outdir=//' | sed 's/\r//')
DUMPDATE=$(stat -c %y $(ls -rt | tail -n 1) | cut -d ' ' -f1 )
DATABASE=$( grep "^url=" DecodePC.properties | sed 's/^url=.*\///' | sed 's/\r//')
OUTFILE="$OUTDIR/all.pcode"
echo "outdir -- $OUTDIR  dump date -- $DUMPDATE  database -- $DATABASE"

echo "PeopleCode Dump $DATABASE   $DUMPDATE" > "$OUTFILE"
find "$OUTDIR" -type f -name \*.pcode | while read file; do processFile "$file"; done

That seemed to get the trick done for me nicely.

This program has more features than just this. You should explore it. It can check the code into a sourcecode repository to track changes. Kudos to whoever wrote it!

Resources

 

Null Date in PeopleCode

Just the other day, I needed to set a Date to null or blank, and I couldn’t remember how to do it.  Here’s my notes so that I can remember next time.  Javier’s blog came to the rescue:

Javier’s PeopleSoft blog: Setting Date Variables to Null in PeopleCode

The short version is: use the Date(0) function:

     Local Date &hireDate;

     &hireDate = Date(0);

Here’s some more information to explore a little more in depth…

Read More

Scheduling a Process from PeopleCode

The process scheduler provides a good standard way to launch a process.  You simply add a subpage to your run control page, and the delivered “Run” button does all of the work for you.  But sometimes, you want to run the process other ways.  Sometimes, you might want to create a more customized feel on a end-user page and launch a process from a push button.  Or, you might want to launch an additional process from an App Engine program.

In this post, I would like to drop notes to make this easier the next time I need to do it.

Read More

PeopleCode: Unzipping

I come upon a requirement to unzip a file in a platform independent way.  Jim Marion got me most of the way, but his code didn’t write it to file.  Here’s my adjustment to make a function that wrote it to file:

Function unzip(&inputZipFile, &targetDir)
  Local JavaObject &zipFileInputStream = CreateJavaObject("java.io.FileInputStream", &inputZipFile);
  Local JavaObject &zipInputStream = CreateJavaObject("java.util.zip.ZipInputStream", &zipFileInputStream);
  Local JavaObject &zipEntry = &zipInputStream.getNextEntry();
  Local JavaObject &buf = CreateJavaArray("byte[]", 1024);
  Local number &byteCount;

  While &zipEntry <> Null

    If (&zipEntry.isDirectory()) Then
      REM ** do nothing;
    Else
      Local JavaObject &outFile = CreateJavaObject("java.io.File", &targetDir | &zipEntry.getName());
      &outFile.getParentFile().mkdirs();
      Local JavaObject &out = CreateJavaObject("java.io.FileOutputStream", &outFile);
      &byteCount = &zipInputStream.read(&buf);

      While &byteCount > 0
        &out.write(&buf, 0, &byteCount);
        &byteCount = &zipInputStream.read(&buf);
      End-While;

      &zipInputStream.closeEntry();
    End-If;

    &zipEntry = &zipInputStream.getNextEntry();
  End-While;

  &zipInputStream.close();
  &zipFileInputStream.close();
End-Function;

unzip("/tmp/myzipfile.zip", "/tmp/out");

Resources

Explorations in Component Interface

This is part one of a multi-part series exploring some quirks in using Component Interfaces with Application Engine programs.  If nothing else, hopefully, these will give new developers some insight into how to use a Component Interface.  My goal is to expose a bug in the Application Engine tool that maybe Oracle will see and fix.

This first part will simply walk you through creating a Component Interface.  This part is just a map to associate the fields on the screen (or really in the component’s buffer) with an API property that can be accessed with code.

First, we create a new definition in Application Designer.  You can either use the Ctrl + N keyboard shortcut or the File > New menu.  Choose Component Interface from the list:

New Object List in App Designer

Next, have no fear — you will see the open dialog making it look like you want to open a component.  Really, Application Designer is just asking you which component you want to map.  In this example, we will use the “PERSONAL_DATA” component, which is the Modify a Person screen (Workforce Administration > Personal Information > Modify a Person):

Pick the Component

Next, Application Designer asks you if you want to default the properties.  I almost always say yes to this questions because it will make Application Designer do all the work for you in generating the map.  The properties will be given names based on their field names in the buffer:

Yes to Default the Properties

Now, you should have a new component interface generated for you.  Notice that the left side is the Component Structure.  It is the same as the Structure tab on the Component itself.  The right side is the map of record/field to property name.  In this screenshot, I have the component open in the background and I drew a line to show how the structure is the same.  Then, I drew a line from the structure to the property generated for one of the fields:

How the fields map to properties

Finally, save the component interface.  You can either use the Ctrl + S keyboard shortcut, or you can use the File > Save menu.  I gave it the name BLG_PERS_DTA_CI.

Save Dialog

While your at it, you may also want to add it to the project.  You can use the F7 keyboard shortcut or the Insert > Current Definition Into Project menu.

This concludes creating the Component Interface.  Please stay tuned for the next steps …

Arrays Question

This post is to address a question posed in one of the comments on another post.  The answer is a little too in-depth for a comment reply.  Also, I had been wanting to blog more about arrays anyway.

Here is the question:

Hi i have seen your comment on Arrays.
i need your guidence on creating array and using it in Peoplecode App package.
I have some logic written in SQR. Same thing i want create in App Package which can be used.
Let me brief you my requirement.
i have several parameters to be stored in an array which i will get from different validations and SQL tables for employees.which i will store it in a array. After finishing validations for all the employees i have pass those employee id and details some other system so i want to replicate in App package using Array can you guide me how i can design it in App package.

I also decided to use my step-by-step that I just completed.  So, this answer will build on that post.

Listening to the requirements, I don’t think that we need to extend the array object like the post that this comment was on.  At most, I think we might want to create an employee object that will store all of the fields (or parameters as the requirements call them) needed.

So, I am creating a new Application Package called BLG_BLOGGING.  Then, I am inserting a new Application Class called “EmployeeObject”:

Then, I created three properties in that class to hold three parameters relating to an employee.  I did not specify the “get” or “set” keywords so I don’t have to create getter and setter methods.  This is the easiest way to add properties to a class because you don’t have to write any code for the properties.  Here is the code:

class EmployeeObject
   property string EmployeeID;
   property string FirstName;
   property string LastName;
end-class;

Then, in the Application Engine program, you have to import your new class.  This statement does nothing more than tell the program you are going to use this class later on.

import BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject;

Here are the different variables that we will need.

Local File &log;
Local BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject &emp;
Local array of BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject &ary;
Local number &x;

This code creates an empty array.  We need to pass it a copy of the employee object just so it knows what data type will be stored in the array.  It will not actually store anything in the array at this point.

&emp = create BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject();
&ary = CreateArrayRept(&emp, 0);

Here is where we load the first employee into the array.  We set all of the properties, and then, we use the push() method to insert it into the array.

&emp.EmployeeID = "001";
&emp.FirstName = "Bob";
&emp.LastName = "Tomato";
&ary.Push(&emp);
&log.WriteLine("Added Bob Tomato -- length = " | &ary.Len);

Then, we repeat that with another employee.

&emp = create BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject();
&emp.EmployeeID = "002";
&emp.FirstName = "Larry";
&emp.LastName = "Cucumber";
&ary.Push(&emp);
&log.WriteLine("Added Larry Cucumber -- length = " | &ary.Len);

Finally, we add a third employee just to give us some data.

&emp = create BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject();
&emp.EmployeeID = "003";
&emp.FirstName = "Lunt";
&emp.LastName = "Squash";
&ary.Push(&emp);
&log.WriteLine("Added Lunt Squash -- length = " | &ary.Len);

Then, we need to loop through the array to show what it contains.  The Get() method accesses one of the elements in the array.  It does not remove the element from the array.

&log.WriteLine("");
&log.WriteLine("Employees: ");
For &x = 1 To &ary.Len
     &emp = &ary.Get(&x);
     &log.WriteLine("  " | &emp.EmployeeID | ") " | &emp.LastName | ", " | &emp.FirstName);
End-For;

Final Solution

Here is the Application Package, Employee Object:

class EmployeeObject
   property string EmployeeID;
   property string FirstName;
   property string LastName;
end-class;

Here is the App Engine Program:

import BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject;

Local File &log;
Local BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject &emp;
Local array of BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject &ary;
Local number &x;

&log = GetFile("c:\temp\log.txt", "W", "A", %FilePath_Absolute);

&emp = create BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject();
&ary = CreateArrayRept(&emp, 0);

&emp.EmployeeID = "001";
&emp.FirstName = "Bob";
&emp.LastName = "Tomato";
&ary.Push(&emp);
&log.WriteLine("Added Bob Tomato -- length = " | &ary.Len);

&emp = create BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject();
&emp.EmployeeID = "002";
&emp.FirstName = "Larry";
&emp.LastName = "Cucumber";
&ary.Push(&emp);
&log.WriteLine("Added Larry Cucumber -- length = " | &ary.Len);

&emp = create BLG_BLOGGING:EmployeeObject();
&emp.EmployeeID = "003";
&emp.FirstName = "Lunt";
&emp.LastName = "Squash";
&ary.Push(&emp);
&log.WriteLine("Added Lunt Squash -- length = " | &ary.Len);

&log.WriteLine("");
&log.WriteLine("Employees: ");
For &x = 1 To &ary.Len
     &emp = &ary.Get(&x);
     &log.WriteLine("  " | &emp.EmployeeID | ") " | &emp.LastName | ", " | &emp.FirstName);
End-For;

&log.Close();

Here is the final output:

Added Bob Tomato -- length = 1
Added Larry Cucumber -- length = 2
Added Lunt Squash -- length = 3

Employees:
  001) Tomato, Bob
  002) Cucumber, Larry
  003) Squash, Lunt

Step-by-Step: App Engine for Testing PeopleCode

This is a how-to post that I intend to refer back to from time to time.  The goal is to create a simple Application Engine program into which we can drop some PeopleCode and see how it works.  Assuming we don’t need any of the online pieces, this is much easier than going through all of the steps to create a page and register it so we can see it online.

Step 1: Create a new Application Engine Program

In Application Designer, click Ctrl + N or use the File > New menu option.  This will open the “New” dialog, and you can choose Application Engine program from the list.

You new program should look like this:

Step 2: Disable Restart

This step is very important.  If you don’t disable the restart and your program crashes, you will have to go through a few extra steps before you can rerun it.

First, click on the properties button while your program is in focus (you can also use the File > Definition Properties menu):

This should bring up the Properties dialog.  Then, go to the Advanced tab.  Check the “Disable Restart” option.

Step 3: Add an Action

First, click on the “Step 1” step to select it.  I usually click anywhere in the gray, and this should turn it black.

Next, click on the Add Action button, or you can use the Insert > Action menu.

Finally, change the type from SQL to PeopleCode.

Step 4: Save the program

At this point, you need to save before you can add PeopleCode.  You can use Ctrl + S, click on the Save icon on the toolbar, or you can use the File > Save menu.

Step 5: Enter the PeopleCode

First, open the PeopleCode program by double clicking anywhere on the gray of the PeopleCode action.  Or, you can right click on it and choose the “View PeopleCode” option.

Next, you will probably want to open a file to show output from your PeopleCode testing.  You can use this PeopleCode:

Local File &log;
&log = GetFile("c:\temp\log.txt", "W", "A", %Filepath_Absolute);

Then, you can print to that file with the writeline() method.  For now, we will just print Hello, World.

&log.WriteLine("Hello, World!");

Finally, you will probably want to close your file:

&log.Close();

Here is what it all looks like:

Make sure to save once you make these changes.

Step 6: Run the Program

Again, after you have saved, go back to the main program window where you can see the Main section, Step 1, and your new PeopleCode action.  Then, click the run icon.

In the dialog, Check the Output log to file and uncheck Run Minimized.  The output log to file allows you to see what happened.  Otherwise, the window will close before you see what happened.  The run minimized isn’t a big deal, but if the program doesn’t run minimized you see it pop up and go away better.  When the program goes away, you know it is done running.

Finally, when it is done, check the output.  If you used the paths that I did your output should be in the c:\temp directory.  You should have two files.  The first, is the main output from the program.  Check this to make sure the program ran to success:

The second is the log that your PeopleCode created.  For now, it should just say, “Hello, World”.